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20+ Ways to Celebrate Black History Month in the DC Area.
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The urban center of Fairfax County, Tysons is a destination of its own.
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Joshua Holden is a modern-day Mr. Rogers with hipster appeal! When Mr. Nichols makes an unnerving self-discovery that causes him to spiral down a path of loneliness and hopeless despair, it's up to Joshua and his cast of characters, including Larry the Lint and the Wonderbook, to show his best friend the joy in being yourself. With live music, physical comedy and multiple styles of puppetry, this whimsical show is sure to bring out everyone's joyful side.

Come discover why Joshua Holden was named one of "20 Theatre Workers You should Know" by "American Theatre" magazine.

“An unabashed “ambassador of joy,” Mr. Holden has dedicated his shows to lightening the mood of all in the theater, puppets and humans alike. Accompanied by the musician Jeb Colwell, he does this through physical comedy, oddball props, and wry commentary." — The New York Times