Your handy guide to everything holidays & winter in Fairfax County! ❄️
Winter fun, hiking, live shows, and more!
See why Fairfax County is a great place to be during the holiday season!
Catch a show at Fairfax County's newest performance hall.
See top-notch artists in an intimate setting all winter long at The Barns at Wolf Trap.
Fun shows all winter long at George Mason University's premiere concert hall.
Find a pet-friendly spot in Fairfax County!
Find hotels close to a Metro station.
Looking for a hotel in a specific area? Use our handy hotel map!
Next happy hour? Try some of the local breweries & brewpubs!
Find outdoor dining at your favorite restaurants this summer!
From K-BBQ to double-fried chicken, enjoy the DC region's unofficial "Koreatown."
Fly to Fairfax County!
From metro stations to hotels to attractions, find the map you need most.
Carry all there is to see and do right in the palm of your hand.
Explore some of the many sites and attractions in the Washington, DC region virtually to help you plan your trip.
From Civil War battlefields to DC monuments, here's your guide to the area.
The urban center of Fairfax County, Tysons is a destination of its own.
< Back To Results

    Cory Branan

  • Dates:
    January 21, 2022
  • Time:
    Doors 6:30PM | Show 8PM
  • Admission:
    Premier Plus Low Ticket Alert! $20.00 Select tickets Premier $20.00 Select tickets General Admission Seated $18.00 - 0 + General Admission Standing $15.00
  • Location:
  • Address:
    227 Maple Avenue, East, Vienna, VA 22180
Details
Map

ADIOS is Cory Branan’s death record. Not the cheeriest of openings, but like all of Branan’s mercurial work, it’s probably not what you think. As funny and defiant as it is touching and sad, this self-dubbed “loser’s survival kit” doesn’t spare its subjects or the listener.

Not even Branan’s deceased father is let off the hook. In the tender homage “The Vow” he drolly cites his father’s favorite banality “that’s what you get for thinking” as “probably not the best lesson for kids.” For most songwriters that would be the punchline but Branan pushes through words and, in his father’s actions, finds a kind of “genius in the effortless way he just ‘did’.”

Not all the death on ADIOS is literal mortality. “Imogene” is sung from the wreckage of a love that once “poked fun at the pain, stoked the sun in the rain” but ends with the urgent call to “act on the embers, ash won’t remember the way back to fire.”

The trademark lyrical agility is mirrored sonically. Never a genre loyalist, ADIOS finds Branan (much like his musically restless heroes Elvis Costello and Tom Waits) coloring outside the lines in sometimes startling shades of fuzz and twang. While unafraid to play it arrow-straight when called for (“The Vow,” “Equinox,” “Don’t Go”), ADIOS veers wildly from the Buddy Holly-esque rave up “I Only Know” (sung with punk notables Laura Jane Grace and Dave Hause), through the swampy “Walls, MS” to the Costello-like new wave of “Visiting Hours.”

The blistering punk of “Another Nightmare in America” bops along daring listeners to “Look away, look away, move along, nothing to see here” (the song is written from the point of view of a racist killer cop). And as the mourning singer on “Cold Blue Moonlight” shifts from paralysis to panic, the song’s jazzy drone shifts to an almost Sabbath fury. The tonal shifts are always deliberate and not just simple genre hopping; while the turns can be jarring you can trust Branan to take you somewhere unexpected.