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Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey House

  • Address:
    9000 Richmond Highway
    Alexandria, VA 22309
  • Phone:
    (703) 780-4000
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Frank Lloyd Wright’s Pope-Leighey House stands as a classic example of Usonian architecture, a style intended to be both affordable and distinctly American. During the 1930s, Frank Lloyd Wright set his formidable attention towards designing affordable middle-class residences. More than 100 of these modest homes, referred to as Usonian, thought to mean "the United States of North America," were constructed between 1936 and Wright's death in 1959, including the Pope-Leighey House (1940). Commissioned in 1939 by Loren Pope, a journalist in Falls Church, VA, the residence was sold to Robert and Marjorie Leighey in 1946. The house was in the path of an expansion of Highway 66, so in an effort to preserve the building, Mrs. Leighey gave the property to the National Trust, which relocated it to nearby Woodlawn and granted her lifetime tenancy. Mrs. Leighey occupied the house at Woodlawn until her death in 1983.  Though small in size, this gem is rich in architectural details and is well worth the visit.

Open seasonally, Friday-Monday, 11am-3pm.