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The urban center of Fairfax County, Tysons is a destination of its own.
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Old Town Hall Fairfax

  • Address:
    3999 University Drive
    Fairfax, VA 22030
  • Phone:
    (703) 385-7858
  • Fax:
    (703) 246-6321
Overview
Map
Yelp

Joseph E. Willard, who served as lieutenant governor of Virginia and minister to Spain, financed the construction of Old Town Hall and gave it to the town in 1900. He was said to have been the most influential political figure in Fairfax County at the turn of the century. He was the only child of the Confederate spy, Antonia Ford and Joseph C. Willard, a Union major, and co-owner of the famed hotel in Washington D.C. A renovation of the hall by the City and Historic Fairfax City, Inc. was completed in 1987. Second floor renovations began in 1995 and are now complete. Many residents saw their first motion picture here in 1911 (the admission price was 10 cents).